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Last Post 09-11-2012 4:22 AM by  Ty (ACO Leicestershire)
Happy Huts - be aware
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Kerstin
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08-11-2012 1:42 AM

    Saw this on a blog i regulary visit... again it happened..these huts are dangerous !!


    I am going to try to do this post without actually mentioning any brand names so as not to incur the wrath of their manufacturers. They tend to get angry when we trash their products. Let’s just say that if you google the words “hut” or “tent” in combination with the words “happy” or snuggly” you will get product results.

    The parrot huts look like miniature pup tents. They are made of various fabrics and many are fleece lined. The interior is about 6 inches from the apex of the tent to the bottom – the sides are plush and comfy. It’s the perfect size for a small parrot.

    Many conures just love them. It is their place of choice for a good night’s sleep and they look cute as can be inside them. So, the post that follows might be a big disappointment to some small bird owners…

    These tents have two MAJOR downsides:

    1. Many birds that use them become very hormonally aggressive. They tend to envelop a bird’s entire body – something that puts many birds “in the mood”. They are also reminiscent of nesting spots just about the size that a small bird would prefer.These facts might bring the “mood” on during any time of the year, and they are definitely responsible for escalating normal seasonal breeding behaviors in many birds. Conures and quakers are known for their cage territorialism and the tents are known to increase those aggressions as well.
    2. If the above isn’t enough to make you think again about these products, THIS WILL: They are, without a doubt, the single most dangerous cage accessory on the market today. Parrot tents have been responsible for more avian injuries and deaths than any other product type sold.

    The problem is that they are made from fabric, which is also their attraction for a parrot. It’s what makes them comfortable and warm and alluring. Birds love fabric because it’s soft and pliable. Chewing on it makes it fluffy and plump and a parrot will spend hours manipulating fabric to their own specifications.

    Some products are sold with fabric strips inside, sometimes marketed as an attached preening toy, that encourages further chewing. As the fabric is broken down, it exposes smaller strands that get tangled around legs, toes AND necks.

    When a bird gets caught in fabric strands, they tighten as he bird struggles to free itself leaving no room for it to snip it away with the beak. If the strand prevents blood flow for too long, the result is amputation of that body part. I don’t think I have to elaborate about what happens when a bird’s neck becomes tangled.

    It can be difficult to see the level of destruction that takes place inside the small openings. Some people opt to continually trim the excess fray from the fabric, but they can’t control what happens when their birds are in their cage unsupervised. Dangerous fraying can occur in a single afternoon.

    Just a word of warning to all bird owners, PLEASE re-consider getting any type of [parrot tents] for your birds (especially Conures, as they love to chew on them). I nearly lost my beloved jenday today in one of them (the soft, fleecy type). Her foot became caught up in the newly chewed threads, on the floor of it, and had twisted among some of the threads, and then she panicked, and got her whole head and torso caught under just a couple of the threads. I grabbed the scissors right away, and immediately cut her free, and was able to save her. She’s fine, no harm done. Actually, I was worse off than she! Permanent end to that hut in her cage!

    But…. was not so lucky last year, when my mom lost her dear conure to a very similar accident with one of those huts, it was one of the stiffer types of these things, that have red and blue cloth, over cardboard. She had chewed around on the front part of the hut, along the edge, and was going after that “one thread more”, when her head became entangled between the threads on the fabric, and the cardboard, and she strangled to death. She died instantly, despite our quick efforts to save her.”

    The stories on the internet of similar experiences are everywhere. I know that it will be hard to take away something that your bird loves so much, but don’t make the mistake of assuming that because he has not yet begun chewing on the tent, that it will not do so in the future, especially when they get nesty during a particularly hormone driven breeding season. It isn’t worth the gamble.


    Treat Animals like Humans - with R E S P E C T !!!
    Victoria Whitfield
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    08-11-2012 5:12 AM
    I've posted repeatedley on the dangers of these.

    There are so many safe alternatives such as chubes which are readily available from the usual suspects in a variety of sizes which are made of vegetable parchmant and if they chew them, it will not kill them!!

    Be warned, it only takes a minute to create a blockage in a bird system and you lose a much loved friend. Simply not worth the risk!!
    Ty (ACO Leicestershire)
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    08-11-2012 5:29 AM

    Hi, I have a tent for my Quaker which she used for a couple of nights and now doesn't bother with so after reading this it will go in the bin.  But what is recommended for birds so they can get a bit of privacy during the day if they want to?  She isn't sexually mature yet but there is also the question of not providing anything she wil see as nesting (or needing to remove it during whatever time of the year that will be?).  She actually isn't territorial (well not yet anyway)

    So for 'nite nites', the ushering of those words results in a mad dash to the top of the cage  what is best?   After several minutes convincing her she really does need to go to bed she goes to the top perch which is nail perch and I cover the cage.  Does she need anything else?

    Ty

    Kerstin
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    08-11-2012 6:56 AM

    TY i have a wooden box screwed on to cage . perfect as a toy box as well

    i also use the big cardboard chubes and hang them in cage x

    Treat Animals like Humans - with R E S P E C T !!!
    Helen W
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    08-11-2012 9:57 AM
    Ty,

    As Kerstin says, a suitable sized cardboard box is fine, if you need some sort of hut.

    And for nite nite time, the top perch and a cage cover is perfectly acceptable. Our two boys go the the top perch, get the light turned off and don't even get covered. They stay lovely and quiet until the room gets really light.
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    Dave V
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    08-11-2012 10:20 AM
    As Helen says, Top perch and no covers in my flock. We do have blackout curtains for most of them, though not all! Don't hear a peep out of them until daylight (or until we open the blackout curtains).
    Dave.
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    Ty (ACO Leicestershire)
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    09-11-2012 4:22 AM
    Thanks for the advice. I've only recently started to cover the cage. It was not to quieten her down (she always just goes quiet once the TV is off, blinds are closed and the lights are switched off) but more to protect from any chills or draughts as the nights started to get cooler. She doesn't seem to mind either way, being covered or uncovered.
    The cozy tent as gone and I'm going to call in at Wilko's on the way home tonight and pick up a Chube and bolt it to the side of the cage it's will act as a toy and a place to go for privacy during the day if she feels the need. I'll mount it lower than the highest perch as I prefer her to be on a nail perch during the night, help keep those nails short.
    Ty


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