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Last Post 15-11-2012 11:52 AM by  kegsky
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Ann Conway
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26-01-2011 2:26 AM

    Following Mandy's thread bringing our attention to the plastic cage with a cockatoo in it.

    These types of cages are TOTALLY UNSUITABLE for birds, and should not be used at all. There is nowhere for the bird to be able to play and climb.

    Whatever your choice of cage, please remember, the size must be at least one and a half times the wingspan of the bird, and preferably, although not all have  some horizontal bars.

    As with birdlines policy on NOT using plastic cat carriers for transporting birds.

    These plastic cages are most definately NOT to be used for any birdline birds under any circumstances.

     

     

    Rescue Manager North & Aco for Cumbria.
    Julie
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    26-01-2011 7:32 AM
    Totally agree that the plastic cat type carriers are unsuitable but to say that they are NOT to be used in any circumstances for a BL bird is I have to say quite patronising. I'm sure as I am sure are all members that we are all in agreement re the cages but to be instructed in this way I find unpleasant.
    picowitch
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    26-01-2011 9:34 AM
    as it is a policy, would it be wise to include it in information for new fosterer's of birdline birds as I would imagine there might be memebers out there who are not aware of this if they dont use the site much and might use them for transportation to vets appointments etc.
    Ann Conway
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    26-01-2011 9:38 AM
    It was not intended to be patronising or unpleasant Julie, and I apologise if that is how it came across.Yes older members may already know and agree, but we do have NEW members joining birdline all the time, and they may unaware of our policy with regard to them.
    We have in the past had birds injured in them.This is when we had to emphasise that birds had not to be transported in them. If a member goes to collect a bird they are fostering and they arrive with a plastic cat carrier, that bird cannot be then collected until they have a travel cage which is suitable.
    It is far better to know in advance, rather than to turn up to collect their bird only to be told it cant be moved.
    Onto the plastic see through cages, which was the main topic, again they are deemed to be unsuitable for reasons which are very obvious to MOST of us,but unfortunately not every person does see the obvious, so it needs to be made clear to avoid any misunderstanding.
    I would hate to think that someone hoping to foster a bird may go out and buy one, spend their money and then find out later it is no good.
    As always, our main concern is for birds, and I stand by what I have said.







    Rescue Manager North & Aco for Cumbria.
    Mandy
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    26-01-2011 10:48 AM

    I dont think it is patronising Julie hun, it is just fact, that the plastic cat carriers are not to be used for transporting BL birds.  I was on the receiving end of one of the reasons not to use them a few years back, and it was not nice.  They are not safe and not secure, and for the larger birds, very easy to escape from.  This is why we do say that our policy is not to use the cat carriers for our birds.

    I think the new members pack is a good idea, detailing the main points to remember, or maybe not so much a new members pack but a pack given maybe when the foster homecheck is done? Im just thinking if we have to detail everything down in the membership pack we could be there a while lol

    http://s22.photobucket.com/albums/b324/Mandyd1975/
    picowitch
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    26-01-2011 10:55 AM
    i agree mandy, maybe a foster carer welcome pack could have all the extra info that you would only need if u were caring for a BL bird.
    Julie
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    26-01-2011 12:10 PM
    I agree with the idea of including some kind of welcome pack mentioning that the plastic carriers/ cages are unsuitable. Maybe my post came across wrong but what I was trying to say was that altho we all know what is right for the safety of the birds we also need to put the info across differently even on a post. Maybe if a new member was reading thro the forum they could be put off by how things are put across and if the info was written more tactfully and not as an order then more birds could be fostered and possible safehouses recruited. Now I know that if the said new member was adament that using the plastic carriers/cages was right then helping out with a BL bird or indeed any other bird is really not the right thing for them.

    Look guys if I have caused a debate then I'm sorry. So enough. All is done..........
    Mel
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    26-01-2011 12:28 PM

    When Tracey and I go through applications on the telephone for rehoming, this is one thing that we always mention to protential fosterers is that they will need a proper bird carrier and that if they turn up with anything else they will be sent away birdless

    God loved birds he created trees, man loved birds he created cages :-(
    Mandy
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    26-01-2011 1:00 PM

     Aaaah see - I've learnt something new now! That's something to bear in mind thanks for that Mel! 

    http://s22.photobucket.com/albums/b324/Mandyd1975/
    Deb Tux
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    13-11-2012 3:08 PM
    Is this so called "cat carrier" the type that goes by the name skipper could someone please let me know I was going to get one from a website that does sell this type specifically for parrots????
    Helen W
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    13-11-2012 3:22 PM
    Deb,

    A proper parrot carrier is appropriately sized (depending on species) should have a perch and food and water bowls. They are usually cage bars on all sides, so that the bird can see out. I would suggest checking out Scarlett's parrot essentials for an idea. I'm sure Scarlett will have a picture on there for you to get an idea. Also, a parrot carrier should have a proper clasp - most cat carriers can be opened easily and people have had parrots escape.
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    Deb Tux
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    13-11-2012 11:50 PM
    Thank you Helen
    Kerstin had pm me and told me about this website
    I was well on the way to spending money that wasnt necessary
    Thank you for your help I have been on this website and its fab
    I feel this is where I will be getting my travel cage from and further toys and stuff !!!
    They will be getting alot of orders from me in the furture
    kegsky
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    14-11-2012 7:59 AM
    without for one moment suggesting there are not any problems with using cat carriers can i ask just what problems people have had. we have used these for a number of years on many occasions and at no time have any incidents of any kind occurred. we have always put a towel inside and also covered the front so that the bird does not possibly get freaked out if not used to travelling. it of course goes without saying that if this is BL policy then we will adhere to it when we do get our first bird (eventually lol)
    Doddie Kent
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    14-11-2012 9:51 AM
    The cat carriers referred to are made of plastic, with a grid in the front end. I've known birds put a foot/leg through the grid and break it. I've known the grid fall off and the bird fly out. I've known the upper and lower halves of the plastic separate by mistake, and the bird fall/fly free. And on top of that, an enclosed, dark cage encourages travel sickness if it's going to happen. That's why. All that being said, I use a cat carrier, made for cats, but it's a wire one, bird can see out all round, I can see bird all the time, so can deal with any problem instantly. The best ones are collapsible crates, with a perch and a couple of pots. And also, of the many hundreds (yes, hundreds) of birds that I've travelled over the years, I've only had two birds that were upset by going in the car. The rest of them took an interest of what was going on, and enjoyed the trip.
    Doddie
    SharonH
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    14-11-2012 9:55 AM
    Also when travelling the bird uses the vertical bars for balance. Every one I've travelled has stood on one leg with the other one holding the bars for balance as the car bumps up and down. I can see that people would imagine that the darker enclosed environment of a cat box might make them calmer, but as Doddie says, most love to see what's going on and enjoy travelling.
    Ann Conway
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    14-11-2012 10:11 AM
    If you look under Advice for members section of the forum, you will see the type travel cage that most of us use.
    Rescue Manager North & Aco for Cumbria.
    Helen W
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    14-11-2012 11:48 AM
    Posted By SharonH on 14-11-2012 09:55 AM
      but as Doddie says, most love to see what's going on and enjoy travelling.

    A perfect example was Joey, our tiel. He used to love wolf whistling at passing lorry drivers!
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    kegsky
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    15-11-2012 11:52 AM
    yeh, but guys, apart from that what else?...i'm kidding, I'M KIDDING. point taken and i will look into getting a more appropriate carrier as suggested as i am aware one incident is one too many. many thanks for the heads up.
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