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Last Post 18-05-2012 1:59 AM by  SharonH
Zinc poisoning and treatment
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Nina
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16-04-2012 12:41 PM

    We are treating our Ducorps for zinc poisoning, and if anyone is interested, this is the approximate costs. Bear in mind that this is our vets and that costs may differ depending on where you go.

    We took Darcy in for the general testing after adopting her. As she is a severe plucker we decided to do the full profile wich includes testing for PBFD, chlamydophila and heavy metal poisoning such as led and zinc, as well as all the blood tests to make sure her liver etc was ok.

    The cost for the tests above was:

    Consultation: £43.50

    Small exotic Gas: £33.07

    PALS Feather Plucking Profile: £239.90

    We also decided to have her DNA sexed which added £43.76 for those curious.

    Once results was back which put her at a level of 59 (20-30 norms, 30-40 definate cause for treatment and investigation, anything above is treated as severe poisoning)

    She went back to the vets for a 5 day treatment, with two injections per day. She had to stay there as it is too far for us to travel twice a day and add to that, I do not have access to a car during the day. These 5 days came to a total of £120.00. After five days of treatment she is back home and has had another blood test done to messure her current poisoning. That came to £40.00. Her levels will most likely come back tomorrow, and she will need to go back in for another five day treatment. (£120.00) This will carry on until her levels are back to normal. (Which may take 3-4 treatments) She is however responding very well, so there is good hope

    This is all uninsured, as you can not cover a bird for an illness it already has. We chose to do it the "right way"  I suppose, as we could have waited a few months before taking her and as such been covered by the insurance. However, doing it this way means that she is now covered for anything else (the insurance will cover her for current illness after 12 months) besides her zinc poisoning, as all other tests came back clear.

    Hope this can be of some use to others.

     

    Margy
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    16-04-2012 1:54 PM
    Hope Darcy's results are good tomorrow Nina!

    Give her a cuddle from me
    http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i28/margy_2006/
    Dave V
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    18-04-2012 1:44 AM
    Hi Nina, £43.76 for DNA sexing!!! If you want any more DNA sexed try Avian Biotech of Truro in Cornwall. They charge just £13 and you get the results in a week. I have always found them very helpful and when you don't want to get the DNA yourself and are having bloods done you can always get your vet to pop a couple of drops of blood on the blood collection card that Avian Biotech supply. Alternatively you can use feathers for DNA sexing with them. I don't mean to make you kick yourself, and in reality the extra cost you paid is small in comparison to what you are having to pay but food for thought for next time!
    Dave
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    Nina
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    18-04-2012 6:06 AM
    Aye, I know you can do the testing cheaper but since we were having bloods taken anyway I'd prefer them to do it at the same time. I am way to scared to pull any feathers for testing (as they have to be fresh) and she pulls them enough herself as it is.

    I dont think I'd ever be in the situation where I'd only DNA sex a bird. I always take new birds to the vet straight away for a checkover (including all tests) so would always do the dna at the same time, rather than risking contamination of tests and/or pull feathers.

    Good ideas for others though Dave, it's always good to know your alternatives
    Nina
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    19-04-2012 5:30 AM
    Just got the results back from the vet and unfortunately the levels had not dropped as much as hoped, she had only gone from 59 to 53 so this time she is back for a 7 day treatment rather than a five day one. The levels of zinc in a cockatoo is for all they know usually a BIT higher than in other birds, but they do not have enough data on 'toos yet to know why so we're still aiming to get her back down to normal levels around 20-30 mark.

    Will be difficult to be without my sweetie for a week, but the difference the first treatment had in her plucking and her behaviour was so big that I know we're doing what is best for her. She will need more treatments for sure to get her levels down but at least we are on the right track. Keep your fingers crossed for her please
    SharonL
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    16-05-2012 12:19 PM
    How are things going???
    Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened
    Nina
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    16-05-2012 2:24 PM
    Hiya Sharon and thanks for asking

    Well since last time she has had 2 more treatments. After the first 7 day treatment she didnt shift her levels AT ALL so she was just back in (got her home today) after yet another 7 day treatment, this time with both injections and oral medication. My vet is in touch with the lab regarding Darcy, who is doing research on cockatoos and zinc poisoning. As far as they know, (they do not have loads of data on toos unfortunately.. or lucky really) 'toos tend to have a BIT higher zinc levels than other parrots, but over 40 is still to be treated as poisoning. The lab person is in contact with other lab and veterinarians in the USA to research this deeper. However, we are going back monday for a new blood test to see if her levels has moved on at all. IF they have dropped significantly then it could be worth another double treatment. If they have not dropped at all, we are going to leave it for a few months and sort of "see what happens". Its no point to keep treating her if it has no effect, and then we might also be able to dig up some more information from the lab people

    The upside to it all is that she is finally making friends with the vets and nurses. She was not very popular the first times around, but now they all love her and she gets to spend loads of time out of her cage, together with the nurses and staff. I cant help but smile though, as she bobs her head and calls for me as soon as she sees me, and then nobody else will do, as she snuggles into my arms. I had a feeling she had "picked" me when I applied for her, god knows I loved her within a day, but it's nice to get it confirmed sometimes Silly, isnt it!
    Kerstin
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    17-05-2012 12:51 AM

    Hi Nina,

    just catched up reading this...

    sorry to hear and same time so lovely to hear how much you love her and care for her.

    I really hope and wish that this double treatment she had helped her and the results will get better.

    She looks soooo cute on that picture.

    And no..you are not silly... they are like our kids..and like kids need reassurance from time to time, we adults need as well. It shows us we do everything right 

    xxx all the best

    Treat Animals like Humans - with R E S P E C T !!!
    smally
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    17-05-2012 9:05 AM
    Nina I too do not think it is silly to hope and realise that your bird has chosen you to be its special bonded person. I know that in our home it is me that our Sennie has bonded with more and the safe house had bonded with my partner Paul but since rehoming he is certainly well bonded with his new owner.
    SharonL
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    17-05-2012 8:15 PM
    Thanks for the update. I too was saddened to read that Darcy has not yet improved enough to cease treatment. My, how lucky to have you as a Mom though!

    Fingers crossed the latest tests bring good news. Keep us posted and give Darcy a big cuddle from us.
    Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains unawakened
    SharonH
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    18-05-2012 1:59 AM
    The only bird I know of that was treated for this down our way had sessions of treatment lasting for 3 weeks at his safehouse. I understand the chelate is vile, and very difficult to get down them though, and this guy hated his safehouse mum, so she did very welll! Maybe the longer treatment was because his levels were higher as he was certainly a very sick bird, but he only needed 2 series of treatment and is now doing very well.

    So hang on in there, it's seriously unpleasant treatment and she still loves you to bits, so I'm confident it will all be fine in the end. If your vet wants to confer, this other one was treated by Ian Sayers at Abbotskerswell Vet centre. (He's on the list)
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