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***IMPORTANT NOTICE 16/7/2017*** - Unfortunately Birdline are now full with regard to rescue birds, and are currently UNABLE take additional birds into the charity. We will provide an update as soon as the position changes

WARNING – Please Be Aware 

If you are looking to re-home your parrot, please always use a reputable Parrot Rescue Organisation.

Always check to ensure the organisation you wish to use is registered with an approved organisation such as ‘The Charities Commission’ or ‘Companies House’.

We do know of some so called ‘Parrot Rescues’ who are taking in birds, and then re-selling them despite what their web sites states.

WARNING – Please Be Aware

If you are looking to re-home your parrot, please always use a reputable Parrot Rescue Organisation.

Always check to ensure the organisation you wish to use is registered with an approved organisation such as ‘The Charities Commission’ or ‘Companies House’.

We do know of some so called ‘Parrot Rescues’ who are taking in birds, and then re-selling them despite what their web sites states.

  
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Last Post 05-07-2016 10:18 AM by  Daveo
Hi there
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Daveo
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02-07-2016 1:47 PM

    Hi to all,

     

    I am new to birdline and currently birdless. I am 61, retired and married to Margaret for over forty years. Our parrot experience is somewhat unusual in that we looked after a timneh grey called smokey joe for a elderly gent while he went away for a few weeks in 2012.

    Smokey was (he is now unfortunately deceased) a 26 year old shy but aggressive bird with a bad history of plucking. However, he settled right in. We were given a list of how to care for and feed him with a big bag of sunflower seeds and peanuts for food!!! Additional instructions were for half a gingernut biscuit daily.

    Smokey seemed to bond to us and certainly didn't wish to return to his previous “owner”, growling and spitting horribly when he returned. The eventual result was that he stayed.

    Our experience of parrots was virtually nil but having (until our move to devon) been a near constant pet owner (dogs cats & fish) we took matters seriously, his cage was tiny and he had never been allowed out, handled or seen a vet. The only parrots that I had been aware of as a child were always out of their cages, I googled and joined facebook groups accordingly and realised his diet and conditions were absolutely awful. His feathers were even covered in meldew!!

    Changing his diet and giving him some freedom seemed paramount. A decent powder coated cage was ordered and when it arrived he watched us build it excitedly and when offered the chance he went straight in, the door was left off whenever we were present although he did not venture out. Fresh fruit and veg and pellets of some kind seemed the way to go with nutrition. As we prepare masses of fruit and veg every day the chop concept seemed best but change was slow and very messy. However his fondness of pomegranate earned him the nickname of Dexter with my son. Nutriberries helped and soon he was eating much better and looking much better and flapping his still tatty wings.

    It quickly became obvious that he understood almost every word that we said and he started to talk (often in context) and after a few months started to venture out of his cage. He blossomed and bonded very well to us both and after several months or so began to step up and enjoy head scratches. He loved music and danced and sang. His first dance is on youtube. He had always listened to the radio at his previous home before he came to us and started to get my attention when a song came on that he liked and when they popped out of my record collection he was overjoyed. Old bowie, dire straits, joan armatrading, don mclean, he had good taste too.

    His condition improved enormously and he became almost fully feathered and became a regular facebook feature. He was somewhat scared of flying and hated hands above him probably due to the horrific way these birds were captured and shipped from the wild. His happiness continued to improve until he seemed like he had always had his freedom but Margaret insisted he was lop sided with some weakness on the left although he would hang upside down and dance and sing very loudly. I made a succession of cardboard toys (unprinted soya based card) on stands that he delighted in tearing to shreds. He did not like getting into a transport cage although he eventually did and we took him into the garden for some sun in preparation for visiting a vet. However the vet situation proved very difficult to solve as due to stress he would/could not travel and despite having a vet practice as a neighbour it proved impossible to get anyone to visit until a new vet arrived in town with exotic pet experience.

    Eventually we managed to get the vet to visit but his prognosis was not good and after tests the vet believed he had neurological problems. He sadly passed (with the vets assistance) in october last year.

     

    Heartbroken, I cannot say more, I'm sure most of you have experienced something similar. Over a hundred tributes on the african grey facebook page provided some comfort, though not much.

     

    I decided that it would be very unfair to get another parrot as we were cracking on a bit age wise but joined birdline anyway to support the cause. Discovering that many birds were available for fostering, it seemed a good option to bring some of that joy back to our house so we have applied to foster a grey on these pages though we have yet to hear anything.

    Whether we are deemed appropriate or not to foster, well done to all for caring for these beautiful, intelligent and too often, emotionally fragile creatures.

     

    Dave & Margaret

     

    Doddie Kent
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    02-07-2016 5:12 PM
    Hi Dave, welcome to Birdline. I don't think you should worry too much about your age - you're considerably younger than me - but I just thought that you might consider being a Safe House. This doesn't stop you Fostering a bird, but Safehousing can be a great way to gain experience, too. Have a think.

    Incidentally, it does take a little time to be contacted when you've Applied to Foster a bird, don't lose heart. The Rehoming Team like to leave a certain amount of time for the bird to be on the Rehoming List, to give as many people as possible a chance to Apply. The more applicants, the greater the choice of the correct home...

    Doddie
    Daveo
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    05-07-2016 10:18 AM

    Hi Doddie,

    Thanks for your reply, I really hadn’t considered that as I thought I would need considerably more experience. But, I certainly have no objection to being a safe house but must confess I don't really know what that would mean in the real world. I have had a poke around the web site but not found any details about this.

    I do have some limitations though as my wife is rather disabled with a rare condition called orthostatic tremor and it does put some limitations on what I can do. I am her primary carer and need to do a lot of the basics for her so I would probably not have the time to clean lots of cages although one is not a problem. I myself suffer from muscloskeletal issues, hence my early retirement so my health is not perfect but it mainly effects my ability to drive a lot and use computers (what I did in my work). However most would say I was far from disabled, that said, I used to take our parrot room to room with me as I prepared food and did other tasks and he used to enjoy this a great deal. Margaret's issues are more serious and prevented her from handling our bird as he could not understand her tremors this is why we applied to foster Charlie, a man's bird. Even under these circumstances Margaret managed to firmly bond with our bird. This dual bond I understand from my facebook groups is quite unusual with greys.

    Probably best that we have a chat about it on the telephone, my details are on your records or I can private message you if you do not have access to these. I would love to help in any way I can.

    Regards dave

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